Category: Property

Why Condotels?

Why Condotels?

While the term “Condotel” is nothing new in the Philippines, it’s meaning has changed dramatically since the hotel-condominium hybrids were introduced 30 years ago. Back then; a condotel unit might look-and feel-like a cramped, converted motel room. Not Now!

Pacific Concord Properties Inc introduces the Condotel Concept through newly built Condominium Buildings designed and conceptualized as Residential Condo Hotels

The Lancaster Cebu Resort Residences and Lancaster Suites Manila, are privately owned condominium units, made available by the individual unit owners through the Condotel Management Company for short-term rentals. They are more spacious and with amenities such as 24-hour Security, Concierge and Reception, Business Centers, Retail Shops and Restaurants, Swimming Pool, Spa and Exercise Facilities

For buyers looking for a vacation property with rental-income potential, The Lancaster Cebu Resort Residences Condotel units are completely furnished and equipped, making them ideal for out-of-town owners. Those same “feels like home” qualities appeal to vacationers seeking an alternative to the traditional hotel room. In fact, popular vacation “hot spots” such as Cebu are seeing a surge in Condotel development, with some hotels being earmarked for conversion to condotel units and other properties being built exclusively for the short-term rental market

According to Beth Collingz, of PLC International Marketing Networks, a Lead Marketing Partner with Pacific Concord Properties Inc., whom have Condotel developments in Metro Manila and Cebu, and specializes in working with international clients: “My phone has been very busy with buyers from the UK, Scotland and Australia interested in purchasing investment properties and holiday homes here. A lot of this interest is being driven by the relatively cheap market prices in the Philippines compared to Europe, especially UK Housing prices, and the easy payment options available for our Condotel Developments, but there are other factors, too. Offshore Property Investors, Foreign baby boomers as well as overseas Filipinos, are looking for ways to maximize their return on investments as they approach retirement, and so are purchasing second homes, particularly Condotel Investments where they can use the Condo for vacations and rent it out through our In-House Condotel Management when they are not using the unit thereby gaining rental incomes that on today’s purchase prices, give a projected ROI on their investments of some 12-16% depending upon the mode of payment for the unit”

Beth Collingz, who runs PLC Global Pinoy, an internet based marketing network specializing in Condotel Investments in the Philippines, indicated that more than 85% of all Condotel sales in Metro Manila were to international clients. While such a level of foreign-purchasing activity is not as high in the Philippines provinces, Cebu in particular, has seen a sharp increase in real estate purchases by international buyers in the past several years.

“These international buyers know it’s a buyer’s market in the Philippines right now—there are a lot of properties available and fewer local buyers,” Collingz said. “I’m working with clients who are purchasing their second property with me. We also have referrals from many of our prior customers and new clients who have found us through our Web sites, lancastersuites.com and plcglobalpinoy.com which include a special section for international buyers”

While Metro Manila is still a popular choice with international buyers, Collingz says clients tell her that it makes more sense to buy in a year-round vacation destination. The Lancaster Cebu Resort Residences Condotel development by Pacific Concord Properties located in Mactan, Cebu — the area around Cebu International Airport — fits the bill with all it offers to International buyers.

Accessibility from Europe is also a factor.

“London to Qatar, London to Amsterdam to Singapore or Hong Kong direct flights to Cebu and Manila, for example, average just 16 hours, add to that the many airline specials from Qatar Airlines whom probably offer the cheapest air fares that fly directly into Cebu and Manila and it’s easy to see why the Philippines is becoming an international community.”

Unlike other offshore rental properties, where the rental market is largely seasonal, in the Philippines there is a strong market for rental properties year round. This gives buyers greater flexibility in choosing when to use and when to rent their property. The strong rental/second home market also has resulted in a proliferation of professional property managers and rental agents, making property ownership and rental easy. Pacific Concord Properties Inc with its flagship Lancaster Condotel Developments fit’s the bill.

Financing Options and Security open up Philippine real estate market to International buyers.

Previously a stumbling block for some international buyers was the perception that it is difficult —if not impossible — to obtain financing in the Philippines. As a result, many purchases in the past were cash sales.

Pacific Concord Properties recently introduced the new affordable easy payment plans for the Lancaster Atrium Manila Condotel Suites where a Studio Unit can be purchased without any down payment, and 67% of the contract price payable over 60 months interest free and the 33% balance payable on turnover of the unit or to be extended for another 60 months through PCPI’s no prequalification no hassle finance plan, sales of the companies inventory of units will surely sell out quickly to investors seeking to take advantage of the Condotel Investment “Boom” in the Philippines.

“Where can you find a 350 sqft Freehold Flat in the heart of Central London for only 25,000 Pounds or a Studio in Manhattan for only 34,000 Dollars and then get up to 16% per annum ROI from rental returns” enthuses Collingz. “These figures probably seem Crazy to London Property Buyers unless they remember the prices of Flats and Apartments back in the late 70’s” and all of this comes complete with average 85 degree temperatures and sunshine nearly all year round” said Beth Collingz whom used to live in South Kensington and still owns several Chelsea Embankment Townhouses and St. Catherine’s Dock Flats before coming over to the Philippines

You must have the answers to the six primary factors to consider when making a real estate investment–and how each one affects your level of income said Collingz

1. Why you’re making the investment. Do you intend to use and enjoy the property? Or, are you only looking at the investment potential? That’s important to your initial outlay and your long-(or short-) term returns.

2. What’s your tolerance for risk? Learn your Risk Comfort Level, is this investment within those parameters?

3. Your options for financing. Cash or credit. Your answer helps determine your investment.

4. What fits well in your existing portfolio? To be well-balanced, your portfolio should have a range of assets including real estate–and your portfolio should include a range of properties.

5. Your level of experience in the market. Experience is the roughest teacher–because it gives the test before it gives the lesson.

6. Your desired level of involvement. Your level of participation will help you determine your type of investment.

Then act. Take a first step. Don’t invest money you can’t afford to lose. Control the circumstances as much as possible. But don’t wait for a sign from above that the timing and the opportunity are ideal. The sign won’t come…and the market won’t wait. For a first deal you should probably invest no more than $50,000.

A major stumbling block for some Investors from the UK was the perception that purchasing property in the Philippines was risky with nightmare stories of fraud and deception abounding due to the lack of Professional Realtors and Internationally accepted principles’ of Real Estate Transactions.

With Pacific Concord Properties Inc adopting International Property Standards and the only Philippine Real Estate Developer to operate the internationally accepted practice of Escrow Trust Account Banking for all payments made by buyers of its Condotel Suites, international offshore property investors need no longer worry about the security of their investments

Another drawback to purchasing property in the Philippines was that most overseas buyers of the real estate have become accustomed to normal home buyers standards like putting their money in escrow (which protects them if the developer does not deliver on its commitments) whenever they buy real property.

Pacific Concord Properties Inc., now sets that “International Standard’ in the Philippines with the “Buy Safe Payment Policy” of Escrow Trust Account Banking with Equitable PCI Bank, one the Philippines largest Banks, for the purchase of a Condotel unit in either the Lancaster Suites Manila, Lancaster Atrium Manila or Lancaster Cebu developments.

Buyers of Condotel units at the Lancaster Suites Manila, Lancaster Atrium Manila and Lancaster Cebu Resort Residences in Cebu, pay their Reservations, down payments and all monthly payments directly to the Companies Trust Account with the Bank thereby ensuring that funds are maintained and ultimately used only for the purpose of direct construction related costs. This not only guarantees that the buyers money is safe, but more importantly the development will be completed on schedule and within projected time frames for the project.

Collingz highlights the importance of working with those experienced in this type of transaction. “Buying property in the Philippines is significantly different from buying in the UK and other European countries, for example,” said Collingz. “The purchase process is more direct, with less stress and more accountability; and we work directly with the buyer or collaboratively with the client’s agent or representatives. Our goal—and that of Pacific Concord Properties Inc — is to make the whole process as easy as possible. Prospective buyers can view properties online on our Web site and save listings they’re interested in an online portfolio”

Communication is the key to the process, according to Collingz. “We spend a lot of time communicating with buyers before they visit, so that we all have a clear picture of the type of property that’s right for them. We also make travel arrangements and hotel accommodations and provide them with information in advance of their visit so they understand the process and their options. That way they can make the best use of their time here—and we can ensure they have time to get to know and enjoy the area.”

In many cases, buyers arrive for a three to five-day visit and sign a sales agreement before heading home. Pacific Concord Properties’ staff then handles every detail of the closing so that on their next visit, the buyers can enjoy their new home or investment property.

For further info please do not hesitate to contact us:

Beth Collingz

PLC International Marketing Networks

Property Buyer’s Guide to the Turkish Mediterranean

Property Buyer’s Guide to the Turkish Mediterranean

An established package holiday destination, Turkey has recently emerged as one of the hottest new property spots in the Mediterranean. Good beaches, great scenery and prices much lower than the region’s more established property markets, like Spain and France, have encouraged huge excitement from holiday home buyers. Despite a difficult year in 2005,Tukrish when the country’s property laws were re-drafted leaving thousands of property transactions frozen for over 6 months, the future looks exciting. New golf courses and marinas, better roads and expanded airports, are adding to the country’s appeal, while the possibility of EU membership in the not-too-distant-future, also bodes well for those investing in Turkish property. The rental market is starting to develop in the main resorts, such as Bodrum, Altinkum, Fethiye, Kalkan, Side and Alanya, with short-term and holiday lets arranged through tour operators, management agents or one of the many new rental websites. However, as a word of caution, remember that in an increasingly crowded marketplace, you need to carefully choose your property in order to achieve reliable rental returns.

So where are Turkish Riviera’s most popular places to buy?
“We decided to buy a villa in Fethiye because it is a proper town and doesn’t close down in the winter,” says Tim Goodman, who moved out from Newcastle with his wife Jenny in 2004. “We love our new life, although it took us a while to get used to some things, like the crazy Turkish driving and the summer heat!”

Tim and Jenny have also found it frustrating not to be able to speak to their Turkish neighbours, so they recently started language lessons twice a week.

“Turkish people are so friendly and welcoming, but we wanted to be able to have a conversation,” explains Jenny. “It is also useful to have some simple phrases when you have someone working on the house.”

Belek is Turkey’s foremost golfing centre, with no less than 6 international standard courses. A 20-minute drive from the city of Antalya and airport, the resort has a long stretch of golden sand too. Not surprisingly, Belek is a property hot-spot, with over 35 new developments in the area. Do your research carefully, as not all are offering value for money. Check the details of each development and compare facilities, the size of units and building specifications. Prices start from £119,000 for a three-bedroom semi-detached villa or £145,000 for a detached property bought off-plan.

“Belek is a really exciting area because of the golf and easy access to the airport,” says Taylan Gundeslioglu, owner of Letsgototurkey construction and estate agency. “But only recently have good quality properties become available.”

Once a Roman slave market, the resort of Side has white sand beaches and some impressive ancient remains, including an amphitheatre and the evocative waterside colonnade of the Temple of Apollo. Due to its archaeological importance, development is strictly controlled around the resort itself, but there are numerous villa and apartment complexes nearby. A two-bedroom apartment typically costs from £55,000-£80,000.
Alanya is one of the Mediterranean’s hottest property spots thanks to its Blue Flag beaches, excellent leisure facilities and entertainment. The sea-girt castle – built by the Selcuk Turks – is another popular attraction. The local property market is dominated by apartments, which start from about £65,000 for a two-bedroom unit near the centre of town. But a 15-minute bus ride away to Mahmutlar and prices drop to under £50,000 for a similar size place on a new complex with good facilities.

Condominium and Fee Simple Ownership of Real Estate

Condominium and Fee Simple Ownership of Real Estate

Real Estate Ownership
Generally, apartment-style buildings are called condos, two-story row houses are known as town homes, and free-standing homes on small lots are referred to as garden homes. Unfortunately, this description creates some confusion about real estate ownership. Apartment, town home, and garden home describe the design or construction of certain homes. The word “condominium” does not refer to a the layout or style of a building. Condominium is a form of ownership of real estate. The form of ownership of real estate cannot be recognized by observing the building design.
Condominium Regime
The legal definition of condominium is: the absolute ownership of a unit based on a legal description of the airspace the unit actually occupies, plus an undivided interest in the ownership of the common elements, which are owned jointly with the other condominium unit owners. Each unit owner of a condominium has individual title to the space inside his unit. The space is sometimes described as beginning with “the paint on the walls.” In addition, each unit owner has an undivided interest in the physical components of the condominium buildings and land.
A popular type of condominium development is the multi-story apartment. In this case, there is no land under each unit. In these developments, the condo association usually handles maintenance of the building exterior and common grounds, while the unit owners maintain the interiors of their units. A condominium association is selected to make decisions about expenditures for repairs, and to handle administrative work related to the common areas. Fees are collected from the unit owners to pay for common maintenance. The association normally holds an insurance policy covering the jointly-owned areas, while individual owners carry insurance for the interior components of their units.
Condo projects may resemble duplexes, town homes, garden homes, or residences on regular lots. In general, the creation of a condo regime allows the developer to get more density approved than would be allowed if he had done single-ownership lots. This is often the reason why the condo regime is chosen instead of a development with single ownership lots. A condominium may be built as two units of a duplex. In this case, the two owners may jointly make decisions concerning maintenance of any common areas. By setting up the units of a duplex as two condos, the owner is able to sell them to two different owners.
Each condominium has rules that are specific to the development, so no assumptions should be made about their requirements. It is important to read the condominium documents carefully before purchasing a condo. The documents specify the maintenance that is covered by the common budget. In one project, the association may handle exterior components, decks, pools, sidewalks and driveways. In another, the individual owners may be responsible for more maintenance of their units, including foundations, roofs, and exterior walls.
If you have questions about the division of labor between the common budget and the individual owners of a condominium, you can present your question to the condo board itself. The board can give you an interpretation of the rules and clarify how the issue has been handled in the past. Another possibility is to ask a real estate attorney to review the documents for you. Realtors, other unit owners, or maintenance workers are not appropriate or reliable sources for the interpretation of condo documents.
The Texas real estate contract for condominiums contains a provision requiring that the buyer be given a copy of the condo documents, with a period of time to review them. During the document-review period, the buyer may terminate the contract without penalty. In addition, a resale certificate is must be provided by the association president or manager. This document provides information on the current budgets, insurance coverage, special assessments, lawsuits and other matters that affect the association.
Fee Simple Ownership
In contrast to the condominium regime, you may own real estate by fee simple. “Fee”, which comes from the word, “fiefdom”, refers to legal rights in land, and “simple” means unconstrained. Fee simple is the most common type of ownership. It is the absolute legal title to real property, including both buildings and land.
In fee simple, there are several different possibilities with regard to your obligations of ownership:
(a) Your property may not be in a subdivision at all. In this case, your deed will not include any subdivision restrictions that control your use of the property. Be aware that there could be some deed restrictions put in place by previous owners. In addition to deed restrictions, you may be governed by city or county ordinances or zoning laws that limit your use of the property.
(b) Your property may be in a subdivision with very few restrictions, no common areas, no architectural control committee, and no mandatory dues. Usually these are older subdivisions.
(c) Your property may be in a subdivision of homes on large lots, or in a town home or garden-home community in which there is a legally created homeowners association. In this case, every homeowner is required to be a member of the association. The association may charge mandatory dues and enforce subdivision rules. A certain level of maintenance may be required of each property owner. For example, you may need association approval of exterior paint colors, fences, or additions to your home.
Like the condominium form of ownership, fee simple ownership does not prescribe how maintenance is handled or how developments are governed. For example, the owners of a town house, with fee simple ownership, may be required to fully maintain their units. Or, the owners’ association may cover painting, roofing and yard work for the owners. In subdivisions where there are single family homes on large lots, it is more common for the homeowners association to manage the common grounds, pools and parks, while the individual lot owners fully maintain their own properties.
Understand your ownership rights and obligations
Before buying into a condominium regime or purchasing a fee simple property, you should have a clear understanding of the type of ownership you will have in your property. If you are buying a condominium, it would be wise to read the condo documents carefully and understand how maintenance is divided between the individual owners and the condominium association.
If your ownership is fee simple, with individual ownership of the land, you should review the deed restrictions (if there are any) and understand the restrictions and obligations that apply to your property. In the fee simple form of ownership, there may be mandatory dues to pay for common area maintenance, or, in some cases, the dues may be used for partial maintenance of the individual properties.
If you have a question about your type of ownership or about your obligations as a homeowner, it would be wise to review the title documents with a real estate attorney before proceeding with your purchase. Ask plenty of questions! A clear understanding of your type of ownership, and of your obligations as a homeowner will result in a more satisfying real estate purchase.

Real Estate Ownership – Condominium or Fee Simple

Real Estate Ownership – Condominium or Fee Simple

Generally, apartment-style buildings are called condos, two-story row houses are known as town homes, and free-standing homes on small lots are referred to as garden homes. Unfortunately, this description creates some confusion about real estate ownership. Apartment, town home, and garden home describe the design or construction of certain homes. The word “condominium” does not refer to a the layout or style of a building. Condominium is a form of ownership of real estate. The form of ownership of real estate cannot be recognized by observing the building design.

Condominium Regime

The legal definition of condominium is: the absolute ownership of a unit based on a legal description of the airspace the unit actually occupies, plus an undivided interest in the ownership of the common elements, which are owned jointly with the other condominium unit owners. Each unit owner of a condominium has individual title to the space inside his unit. The space is sometimes described as beginning with “the paint on the walls.” In addition, each unit owner has an undivided interest in the physical components of the condominium buildings and land.

A popular type of condominium development is the multi-story apartment. In this case, there is no land under each unit. In these developments, the condo association usually handles maintenance of the building exterior and common grounds, while the unit owners maintain the interiors of their units. A condominium association is selected to make decisions about expenditures for repairs, and to handle administrative work related to the common areas. Fees are collected from the unit owners to pay for common maintenance. The association normally holds an insurance policy covering the jointly-owned areas, while individual owners carry insurance for the interior components of their units.

Condo projects may resemble duplexes, town homes, garden homes, or residences on regular lots. In general, the creation of a condo regime allows the developer to get more density approved than would be allowed if he had done single-ownership lots. This is often the reason why the condo regime is chosen instead of a development with single ownership lots. A condominium may be built as two units of a duplex. In this case, the two owners may jointly make decisions concerning maintenance of any common areas. By setting up the units of a duplex as two condos, the owner is able to sell them to two different owners.

Each condominium has rules that are specific to the development, so no assumptions should be made about their requirements. It is important to read the condominium documents carefully before purchasing a condo. The documents specify the maintenance that is covered by the common budget. In one project, the association may handle exterior components, decks, pools, sidewalks and driveways. In another, the individual owners may be responsible for more maintenance of their units, including foundations, roofs, and exterior walls.

If you have questions about the division of labor between the common budget and the individual owners of a condominium, you can present your question to the condo board itself. The board can give you an interpretation of the rules and clarify how the issue has been handled in the past. Another possibility is to ask a real estate attorney to review the documents for you. Realtors, other unit owners, or maintenance workers are not appropriate or reliable sources for the interpretation of condo documents.

The Texas real estate contract for condominiums contains a provision requiring that the buyer be given a copy of the condo documents, with a period of time to review them. During the document-review period, the buyer may terminate the contract without penalty. In addition, a resale certificate is must be provided by the association president or manager. This document provides information on the current budgets, insurance coverage, special assessments, lawsuits and other matters that affect the association.

Fee Simple Ownership

In contrast to the condominium regime, you may own real estate by fee simple. “Fee”, which comes from the word, “fiefdom”, refers to legal rights in land, and “simple” means unconstrained. Fee simple is the most common type of ownership. It is the absolute legal title to real property, including both buildings and land.
In fee simple, there are several different possibilities with regard to your obligations of ownership:

(a) Your property may not be in a subdivision at all. In this case, your deed will not include any subdivision restrictions that control your use of the property. Be aware that there could be some deed restrictions put in place by previous owners. In addition to deed restrictions, you may be governed by city or county ordinances or zoning laws that limit your use of the property.

(b) Your property may be in a subdivision with very few restrictions, no common areas, no architectural control committee, and no mandatory dues. Usually these are older subdivisions.

(c) Your property may be in a subdivision of homes on large lots, or in a town home or garden-home community in which there is a legally created homeowners association. In this case, every homeowner is required to be a member of the association. The association may charge mandatory dues and enforce subdivision rules. A certain level of maintenance may be required of each property owner. For example, you may need association approval of exterior paint colors, fences, or additions to your home.

Like the condominium form of ownership, fee simple ownership does not prescribe how maintenance is handled or how developments are governed. For example, the owners of a town house, with fee simple ownership, may be required to fully maintain their units. Or, the owners’ association may cover painting, roofing and yard work for the owners. In subdivisions where there are single family homes on large lots, it is more common for the homeowners association to manage the common grounds, pools and parks, while the individual lot owners fully maintain their own properties.

Understand your ownership rights and obligations

Before buying into a condominium regime or purchasing a fee simple property, you should have a clear understanding of the type of ownership you will have in your property. If you are buying a condominium, it would be wise to read the condo documents carefully and understand how maintenance is divided between the individual owners and the condominium association.

If your ownership is fee simple, with individual ownership of the land, you should review the deed restrictions (if there are any) and understand the restrictions and obligations that apply to your property. In the fee simple form of ownership, there may be mandatory dues to pay for common area maintenance, or, in some cases, the dues may be used for partial maintenance of the individual properties.

If you have a question about your type of ownership or about your obligations as a homeowner, it would be wise to review the title documents with a real estate attorney before proceeding with your purchase. Ask plenty of questions! A clear understanding of your type of ownership, and of your obligations as a homeowner will result in a more satisfying real estate purchase.

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